Preservation Trail

A couple of weeks ago we were working with Mississippi Heritage Trust (check them out you guys!) on a great event called the Preservation Trail (a marathon, not a sprint).  This was the inaugural year for this event and offered people a chance to visit and view 23 historic sites along the gulf coast from Waveland to Pascagoula.  The driving force behind the trail was to allow people to see all of the hard work that was accomplished post Katrina, how much more is left to be done, and hear some of the amazing recovery stories, and meet some great people to boot.  The tour highlighted buildings such as the Charnley-Norwood house in Ocean Springs, a home that was designed by Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright and was nearly demolished by the storm (if you haven't seen it stop reading this right now and head down there!), 100 Men Hall in Bay St. Louis, where legends such as Etta James, Guitar Slim, and Tina Turner performed (are you singing a little Proud Mary as you read this?), St. Michael's Church in Biloxi, a true testament to community and craftsmanship, and a host of other significant and intriguing buildings.  We traveled along the coast for weeks before the trail meeting people, documenting the sites, and stirring up a bit of interest.  The photos below don't do these places justice so make sure you take the time to get out and see these places and learn about our magical coastal history both pre and post Katrina, have a little fun while learning!

TALLstudio - Charnley Norwood House

The Charnley-Norwood house is located on East Beach in Ocean Springs (in our opinion the best beach along the coast!) and sat for three years after Katrina (holy cow!) before preservation began.

TALLstudio - Charnley Norwood House

The Charnley-Norwood house as it sits today- restored and loved by the community. This is something to be proud of Ocean Springs!

TALLstudio - Charnley Norwood House

The interior of the Charnley-Norwood house is paneled in burled pine, perhaps the most beautiful material EVER.

TALLstudio - Randolph School

The Randolph school in Pass Christian was the local African American school until integration in 1969, the same year that Hurricane Camille shook the coast.  Can you guys believe that this is what the building looked like after Katrina and the below photo is as it sits today...talk about a WOW moment!  

TALLstudio - Randolph School

Today the Randolph School is used as a community meeting place, retiree center, and a theatre-lights! camera! you get the picture!

TALLstudio - 100 Men Hall

100 Men Hall was left alone and abandoned after the storm until Kerrie and Jesse Loya stepped in and saved the ol' gal (or gent).  

TALLstudio - 100 Men Hall

In the mood for some blues?  Swing by the hall (the photo above is as it sits today) for a little jukin' and jivin'.

TALLstudio - Pascagoula Maritime Museum

The Old Pascagoula High School - those lines, those windows, that screen!

TALLstudio - Pascagoula Maritime Museum

We were floored from the moment we walked into the Old Pascagoula High School.  The school is currently beginning transformation and restoration and will live on as a Maritime Museum.  Look at that natural light, people! 

TALLstudio - Pascagoula Maritime Museum

The ultimate pattern inspiration. 

TALLstudio - West Pascagoula Colored School

The West Pascagoula Colored School is one of the buildings on the Trail that needed the most work.  It is a little bit creepy, a lotta bit inspiring, and a whole lotta in need of some love.  

TALLstudio - Walter Anderson Cottage

The Walter Anderson cottage sits on the Shearwater property and is a sight to be seen!  Walking into the building you can feel the creative juices begin to stir and we love that Walter wasn't afraid of a little painting on the walls! 

TALLstudio - Walter Anderson Cottage
TALLstudio - Walter Anderson Cottage

Photo above ^^^^^^^ because who doesn't like magenta flowers, in a beautiful Shearwater pitcher, in the Walter Anderson cottage?  We dare you to see that and not swoon!

TALLstudio - LaPointe Krebs House

The coast at its finest.  We couldn't have had a more beautiful day for the event and we hope to see you there next year!  Want to keep up with all the Mississippi Preservation goings on? Check it out www.mississippiheritage.com.